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How Reasonable Accommodations are Determined

An academic accommodation is essentially a problem-solving process. The task is to determine the necessary adjustments that will enable students with disabilities to have access to the same programs and services available to students without disabilities and to have their academic performance evaluated without the limiting effects of their disability as much as possible. The objective of such adjustments is to accommodate the functional limitations of the student's disability while maintaining the integrity of college courses and programs.

The Accommodations Coordinator determines reasonable academic adjustments for students, taking into consideration recommendations from the physician, psychologist or other clinician that diagnosed the student's disability. The Accommodations Coordinator also ascertains accommodations that previously have been used in educational settings with the student and gives consideration to student preferences for accommodation.

In addition, the Accommodations Coordinator consults with faculty to assist with developing reasonable accommodations to individual course requirements. The Accommodations Coordinator meets individually with students to discuss accommodations. Although some persons may have similar disabilities, each request for accommodation is considered on a case-by-case basis.

  • Accommodations and Services

    Accommodations (Disability Services) recommends specific accommodations based upon documentation received and individual class requirements. The following examples of common accommodation requests may not be appropriate in all situations. Furthermore these examples are not an exhaustive listing of all possible accommodations that may be implemented in the classroom setting.

    Testing Accommodations

    Testing accommodations may include extended time, reduced-distraction testing situations, taped or orally-administered tests, alternate test formats, readers, and/or scribes. Students should discuss testing accommodations with their instructors at the beginning of each term. The Testing Center proctors examinations for students who need to use assistive technology or whose instructor is unable to provide test proctoring. Students are obligated to comply with Accommodations (Disability Services) and Testing Center guidelines to ensure smooth delivery of services and maintain integrity of faculty examinations.

    Alternate Formats for Assignments

    In some cases, assignments may be submitted in formats other than those stated in course requirements.

    Tape Recording and/or Note Takers

    Students may be permitted to tape record class lectures and/or may request peer note takers. Accommodations (Disability Services) and faculty may assist in arranging for peer note takers.

    Academic Classroom Aids

    In a few cases, students may be permitted to use word processors, spell checkers, and/or grammar checkers for in-class and out-of-class work, if the integrity of the course work is not compromised.

    Adaptive Computer Technology

    The college offers assistance with document readers and other adaptive computer technology; however, advanced notice is needed for preparations to implement this accommodation.

    Academic Assistance

    Academic assistance may be provided through scribes, readers and/or sign language interpreters. However, federal law does not require the college to provide services that place an undue administrative or financial burden upon the college.

    Accessible Shuttle Services

    The campus shuttle is equipped with a ramp and seatbelts.

  • Services of a Personal Nature

    Services of a personal nature are not considered accommodations in postsecondary education. Examples of personal services include but are not limited to attendant care, transportation and mobility.

  • Attendance Policy

    As a McLennan Community College student, you must attend all class sessions. Please know that absences exceeding the minimum number allowed can cause you to be dropped from class or receive an unsatisfactory (F) grade.

    It is your responsibility to follow the Class Attendance Policy for the college and follow the appropriate procedures for dropping classes. If an emergency arises, the instructor must be notified as soon as possible. The Accommodations Coordinator can also be notified if you will be out of class due to health reasons.

  • Differences between High School and College

    An important issue for potential and current college students with disabilities is to understand the differences between the application of disability rights laws in secondary and post-secondary institutions. The most basic distinction between services for students with disabilities in high school and college is secondary settings are geared toward a least restrictive setting whereas post-secondary institutions are obligated to provide access. In other words more responsibility is placed on student initiative in higher education.

    A student's responsibility dramatically increases as they move from secondary to post-secondary education. The charts below illustrates the differences between secondary and post-secondary obligations of students with accommodation requests.

    COMPARISON OF IDEA, SECTION 504, AND ADA
    IDEA SECTION 504 ADAAA
    Law Requirements Provides a free,appropriate, public education in the least restrictive environment; grades K-12 only Requires any agency, school or institution receiving federal financial assistance to provide persons with disabilities accessibility to the programs to the greatest extent possible Extends coverage of Section 504 to employment, public and private educational institutions, transportation providers, and telecommunications
    Definitions Specific disability categories are defined in the law; covers students with educational needs and require specially trained teachers Defines persons with disabilities if they: have a physical or mental impairment which limits one or more major life activity; have a record of such an impairment or are regarded as having an impairment Definition of disability is same as 504 and extends coverage to people who have certain medical conditions
    Who is Covered Students with educational disabilities ages 3-21 or until graduation who require special education (grade 12) All persons with a disability protecting from discrimination in educational setting based solely on disability All persons with a disability protecting from discrimination in educational setting based solely on disability
    Services Provided Services that are remedial in addition to services available to all students Eliminates barriers that would prevent student from full participation in any program/service offered Eliminates barriers that would prevent student from full participation in any program/service offered
    Funding Schools receive federal funding to provide remedial services Requires schools do not discriminate based on disability and provide reasonable accommodations, BUT schools receive no financial support Requires schools do not discriminate based on disability and provide reasonable accommodations, BUT schools receive no financial support
    Evaluation/Documentation School district is responsible for identifying and evaluating students with disabilities Students must self- identify as having a disability by providing adequate documentation as outlined by the college Students must self- identify as having a disability by providing adequate documentation as outlined by the college
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